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Undergraduate Students

Entrepreneurship is interdisciplinary and crosses all departments at Carnegie Mellon and all levels of academic study. The Donald H. Jones Center for Entrepreneurship encourages students of all disciplines to study entrepreneurship by working with schools across campus to cross-list entrepreneurship courses and make them as available as possible to all students. Please visit Carnegie Mellon's Enrollment Services site to register for undergraduate entrepreneurship courses at Carnegie Mellon University.
 
Please visit the Tepper School's undergraduate entrepreneurship track information Web page to see what courses you must take to pursue the undergraduate entrepreneurship track at Carnegie Mellon University.  


70-397 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance
Instructor - Babs Carryer or Michael Ewens
This course studies the financing of high-growth entrepreneurial firms with a focus on venture capital. We will discuss the issues entrepreneurial firms in high-growth, innovative industries face when funding their investments and how venture capital and angel investing can mitigate them. Topics will include business plan evaluation, the economics of venture capital funds and the sources of value in entrepreneurial firms. Rather than preparing students to become venture capitalists or angel investors, we will provide material to help potential entrepreneurs navigate the financial environment. Students interested in taking the course “Entrepreneurial Finance: Valuation and Deal Structure (70-496) must take this course in advance.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Entrepreneurship  (70-415).

70-414 Technology-Based Entrepreneurship for CIT 
Instructor - Babs Carryer
This course is primarily for non-business school students; it includes most of 70-415, assumes no background courses in business and involves additional sessions for core business concepts. Students with majors in science, technology, engineering, the humanities and/or the arts are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues in innovation, business and entrepreneurship. Students can expect to gain a basic understanding of functional areas such as finance, funding, marketing, sales and management.
 

70-415 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Instructor – Katharine Anderson, Bob Culbertson or George White
This course is designed primarily to provide an overview of entrepreneurship, develop an entrepreneurial frame of mind and learn the rudiments of how to differentiate an idea from an opportunity. Students come up with a business idea and explore its potential for becoming a viable business. They do market research and experience the rewards and difficulties in dealing with people in the real world. They will meet entrepreneurs and business professionals as part of the course and learn how to make effective presentations — both written and oral. Other important aspects of the course include self-assessment to determine one’s strengths and weaknesses, understanding the "magic" of leadership and gaining an entrepreneurial perspective on life.
 

70-416 New Venture Creation
Instructor - Bob Culbertson or George White
This course exposes students to the nuances of financing new ventures, getting legal issues handled and marketing the products or services. Students pull together all the ideas and information from different functional aspects of their projects into coherent and persuasive mini-business plans that serve as road maps for building their businesses. These plans are useful and necessary instruments for securing sufficient financing for the new ventures. Prerequisite: 70-414, 420, 421 or 70-415.
 

70-417 Topics in Entrepreneurship
Instructor - Bob Culbertson, S. Thomas Emerson or George White
An independent study course in which students work on a one-on-one basis with the instructor to study particular entrepreneurial topics in which they are interested. Topics can include family business, social entrepreneurship or the development of their mini-business plan into a full-blown business plan. Prerequisite: 70-415 or 70-416.
 

70-418 Financing Entrepreneurial Ventures
Instructor – Babs Carryer
This course addresses the financial issues facing entrepreneurs. Various sources of financing are covered, such as bootstrapping, angels, and venture capitalists. Guest entrepreneurs are invited to class to discuss how they got sufficient funding at the various stages of building their companies. In addition, the venture capital industry is reviewed and issues involved in arriving at company valuations are discussed. Prerequisite: 70-414, 415, 420 or 421.
 

70-420 Entrepreneurship for Scientists
Instructor - Dave Mawhinney
This course is primarily for non-business school students; it includes most of 70-415, assumes no background courses in business and involves additional sessions for core business concepts. Students with majors in science, technology, engineering, the humanities and/or the arts are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues in innovation, business and entrepreneurship. Students can expect to gain a basic understanding of functional areas such as finance, funding, marketing, sales and management.


70-421 (15-390) Entrepreneurship for Computer Scientists
Instructor - William Courtright 
This course is primarily for non-business school students; it includes most of 70-415, assumes no background courses in business and involves additional sessions for core business concepts. Students with majors in science, technology, engineering, the humanities and/or the arts are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues in innovation, business and entrepreneurship. Students can expect to gain a basic understanding of functional areas such as finance, funding, marketing, sales and management.
 
 
70-423 Entrepreneurship for Scientists and Engineers
Instructor - S. Thomas Emerson
This course offers an introduction to entrepreneurial thinking and business concepts for science majors. There are no prerequisites. The course provides an introduction to basic business concepts which can impact those seeking a career in science and technology. It includes sessions in core concepts in business and guest lectures by successful entrepreneurs. Students with majors in science are exposed to fundamental concepts and issues in business and gain a basic understanding of functional areas such as accounting, finance, marketing, sales, and organizational behavior. Students, working in teams, are required to conceive an original idea for a business. They then subject that idea to scrutiny, assessing the market potential, competition, competitive advantages, management requirements, and likelihood for business success.

70-425 Entrepreneurship in the Creative Industries
Instructor - Amanda Fox
This is an introductory course designed for the College of Fine Arts and is targeted towards undergraduate students who want to create new businesses, products or services, or have a thriving career as an independent artist. Students will use real world examples, both for profit and not for profit, from film, art, architecture, fashion, music, media, theater, retail, and design. Students can expect to analyze how creative industries and firms are designed and how these continue to evolve in response to technological, cultural, and economic changes. We will also employ practical tools for finding, evaluating and putting entrepreneurial opportunities into action, including creating a persuasive pitch for a viable creative industry venture. The class will explore core functional areas critical to building entrepreneurial entities, including teams, ideation, marketing and sales, financial analysis, funding, and communications.
 

70-496 Entrepreneurial Finance: Valuation and Deal Structure
Instructor - Babs Carryer or Michael Ewens
This case-based course builds on Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance (70-397) with an in-depth analysis of deal evaluation and investment valuation in entrepreneurial finance. The course covers the motivations and limitations of a wide array of valuation techniques from the perspective of both the demand and supply side of the market. The entrepreneur’s perspective (demand) concerns identifying financing needs and value. The investor’s perspective (supply) requires the use a set of tools to evaluate, structure and price financing deals. The tools include discounted cash flow, the VC method, comparables analysis and real options. Venture capitalists act as financial intermediaries and provide both capital and guidance to entrepreneurial firms. These facts introduce unique twists on valuation and deal selection.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance (70-397) and Finance (70-391).


70-509 Independent Study in Entrepreneurship
Instructor - Arthur Boni or George White
An independent study course in which students work on a one-on-one basis with the instructor to study particular entrepreneurial topics in which they are interested.

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